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Eosinophils



About Eosinophils:

Eosinophils are specific resistant cells
The eosinophil is a specialized cell of the immune system. This proinflammatory white blood cell (WBC) generally has a nucleus with two lobes (bilobed) and cytoplasm filled with just about 200 large granules containing enzymes and proteins with different functions.

The white blood cells (WBC) are stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E). Hematoxylin and Eosin staining a general method used in histology. The hematoxylin marks the nuclei of cells (purple); the control center of the cell is where the DNA located. The eosin stains proteins (pink). The white blood cells are eosinophils (nucleus with 2 lobes) and neutrophils (nucleus with 2 to 5 lobes). The strong pink stains in the eosinophils is the reason why these cells were named "eosinophils", meaning "eosin loving". 

High-magnification H&E staining of blood eosinophils the bright pink marks the mediator- and protein-stuffed granules that break open when the eosinophil is turn on. The granule contents poisonous to both invaders and a person's own cells and tissues.

Eosinophil maturation
Eosinophils are formed completely in the bone marrow where they spend 8 days in the progression of maturation before moving into the blood vessels.  Eosinophils travel through the vessels for 8 to 12 hours before they to finish arrive at aim tissues, they remain for 1 to 2 weeks. Interleukin 5 (IL-5) appears to be the major growth factor for this type of cell.

Eosinophils have many diverse functions:

The functions of the eosinophil are different, some of which are very similar to other white blood cells (WBC). They are implicated in numerous inflammatory processes, particularly allergic disorder.  In adding up, eosinophils might have a physiological function in organ formation.

Eosinophilic functions includes: movement to inflamed areas, trapping substances, killing cells, antiparasitic and bactericidal activity, participating in immediate allergic reactions, and alter inflammatory replys.

The eosinophil is a specialized cell of the immune system first recognized by “Paul Ehrlich” around 130 years before. The majority of our existing knowledge regarding this type of white blood cell came during the latter half of the twentieth century as the eosinophil was wrongly believed to be a precursor of red blood cells during the early 1950's.
 Structure

 The eosinophil generally has a nucleus by two lobes (bilobed), and cytoplasm filled with approximately 200 large granules containing enzymes and proteins with different functions.

Development:

 Eosinophils are formed completely in the bone marrow where they spend about 8 days in the process of maturation before moving into the blood vessels. They go throughout the vessels for 8 - 12 hours before they finally arrive at target tissues, wherever they remain for 1 - 2 weeks. Interleukin 5 (IL-5) is a major growth factor for this type of cell.

 Function

 Eosinophils are proinflammatory white blood cells (WBC) that have lots of functions. They are implicated in frequent inflammatory processes, particularly allergic disorder. The function of the eosinophil are diverse, which are extremely similar to other white cells. Known functions contain movement to inflamed areas, killing cells, trapping substances, antiparasitic and bactericidal activity, contribute in allergic reactions, and modulating inflammatory reaction.

 Eosinophil granule proteins, such as Major Basic Protein (MBP), Eosinophilic Cationic Protein (ECP), eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), are capable of inducing tissue damage and dysfunction. ECP, MBP and EPO have been exposed to be toxic to a variety of tissues together with bronchial, heart, brain, and intestinal epithelium. The degree of tissue injury is correlated to the duration of eosinophilia, the stage of eosinophil launch, and the type of stimulus attracting the eosinophil.
 

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